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What’s Up With Housing?

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Rural RedevelopmentHow to Rebuild Rural Communities…
Affordable housing and neighborhood revitalization aren’t just urban issues.
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Fewer Tampa Bay Homeowners are in Foreclosure and Late on Mortgages.
As more bay area borrowers regain equity in the their homes, foreclosures and mortgage delinquencies in the four-county area have dropped to their lowest level in a decade.

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Biggest Issues in Real EstateTop 10 Issues Facing the Real Estate Industry in 2017
Purchasing a home, securing a mortgage and even signing a lease are all activities that require some thought about the future.
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Next Buyers’ Market? Two or Three Years?
As price growth slows, more sellers should sell, and one economist predicts the market will “meaningfully swing in favor of buyers” in the next two to three years.
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How the Fed’s Rate Hike Will Affect Refinancing.
If every homeowner with a mortgage who could refinance did today, their potential savings would average $260 a month.
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Top 10 Issues Facing the Real Estate Industry in 2017

Biggest Issues in Real Estate

The No. 1 challenge? Polarization and political uncertainty.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Political uncertainty affects trade, consumer prices, home prices and mortgage interest rates.
  2. Big baby boomer and millennial populations (who want different things in their homes) are causing generational disruption and housing mismatch.
  3. The proliferation of real estate technology is also going to have a big impact on consumers, agents and brokers.

[Inman News] DENVER — Every year, the Counselors of Real Estate (CRE) surveys its members to discover what the most pressing issues facing the real estate industry might be.

Yesterday, at the National Association of Real Estate Editors (NAREE) conference in Denver, CRE chair Scott Muldavin unveiled a list of the 10 challenges the industry will face.

“As real estate agents, we’re all futurists,” said Muldavin, pointing out that purchasing a home, securing a mortgage and even signing a lease are all activities that require some thought about the future.

In a departure from previous years, Muldavin started the list with the item that CRE members think is the most pressing one for the industry to face right now.

1. Political polarization and global uncertainty

“Today we’re going to start at the top because political polarization and global uncertainty is an issue that permeates almost all the other issues,” Muldavin explained.

He noted that resurging nationalism, threats to the European Union and the possibility of war with Iran or North Korea — plus uncertainty relative to trade deals — are all contributing to this challenge.

“There are a lot of unintended consequences,” he noted.

Political polarization and global uncertainty have a particular impact on trade, so port, gateway and coastal communities might find themselves with economic or other problems that they haven’t yet had to tackle.

Add to that the fact that the consumer price index, home prices and interest rates are all rising, mortgages are less affordable and communities are increasingly polarized, and you can see how this issue would affect homeownership on an individual and national scale.

2. The technology boom

“One of the biggest booms today is actually the boom in applications,” said Muldavin, noting that in 2011, $186 million was spent on real estate tech applications, and that number had ballooned to $2.7 billion in 2016.

“This move is going to change every aspect of buying, selling and managing real estate,” he said.

Technology will affect home sales in the following ways:

  • Robotics has come alive — and that means your job might not be safe, which could have an impact on the number of households that can afford to buy a home.
  • Autonomous vehicles are coming sooner or later — Muldavin thinks sooner — and that’s going to mean buildings and parking garages are probably due for some redesign, and builders need to start thinking about that now.
  • Consumers are coming to expect growing sophistication from service providers who leverage technology, so those service providers better be ready to deliver.
  • Smart home devices are becoming increasingly popular.
  • Wireless access and bandwidth are key for residential properties.
  • New modes of transportation and new transportation models could be a boom for the suburbs.

3. Generational disruptions

The two biggest generations in the United States — millennials and baby boomers — have very different challenges and varying priorities and needs when it comes to housing, and that gets especially squirrelly when the two groups need to share living spaces.

This means that office, public and residential living spaces should be designed with the demands of both groups in mind, whenever possible, to meet the needs of this side-by-side generational workforce.

And while young renters and buyers have income limits and are marrying and moving to the suburbs later in life, older owners are downsizing and selling so they can move back to the cities.

4. Retail disruption

“This is not exactly a new issue that the retail markets are having a problem,” said Muldavin.

“Between 1970 and today, malls grew at twice the rate of the population.” He noted that the United States has 40 percent more retail space than Canada, five times more than the United Kingdom and 10 times more than Germany. That’s…a lot, especially when you combine it with the wonders of shopping online.

So is it any surprise that so many retail storefronts are closing up shop?

“Retail’s not dying,” assured Muldavin, “but people like experiences” — so current retail stores might be converted to climbing gyms, offices or what Muldavin calls “omnichannel” stores.

And this will all roll up to impact residential real estate; properties within walking distance will be within high demand, and retail disruption can be a residential value determinant, so it’s unwise to ignore it.

5. Infrastructure investment

“Infrastructure is a long-term problem relative to our competitiveness,” said Muldavin, and it’s another one we can’t ignore — it won’t fix itself and it’s only going to keep deteriorating.

He discussed the the infrastructure plan outlined by the Trump administration and said it would push funds into public transportation and other important infrastructure projects.

However, infrastructure projects of this scope are typically taken on when unemployment is relatively high — which it is definitely not right now; we’re at an unemployment rate of 4.3 percent in the U.S., the lowest since 2001.

So where are those infrastructure workers going to come from, and how much will they need to be paid?

There are commercial opportunities for fund management, plus advantages for ports and communities that support global transportation routes, and more infrastructure likely means more jobs (and therefore more money to buy a home), better access to housing and work and other necessary places, improved utilities, improved delivery of goods and more.

“The losers are going to be rural areas, water, electrical grids, parks — anything that doesn’t have a direct public source,” Muldavin said.

6. Housing: The big mismatch

“Affordability is a big issue, but in Cleveland you can still buy a house for $80,000,” Muldavin noted. “So affordability’s not a problem everywhere. The places where jobs are being created, you have huge affordability issues. What they really need to do is get jobs moving to where we have housing that’s affordable.”

This is just one example of the big housing mismatch. Others include:

  • Boomers want large apartments for their downsizing plans while developers have been building much smaller units for millennials.
  • There are far too few starter homes to meet demand in most markets.
  • The poor demand for old, large homes in the suburbs can also hinder move-up or downsizing buyers seeking a change.

7. Lost decades of the middle class

Middle class wages haven’t grown in 20 years, Muldavin noted.

“We have a real challenge in this and it has significant implications for real estate relative to homebuying.”

Is it any surprise that homeownership rates have dropped? Muldavin said that they’re forecasted to go even lower — to 60 percent or below. “We’re not expecting a homebuying boom,” he said.

8. Real estate’s emerging role in health care

Is anyone in the U.S. (aside from perhaps pharmaceutical companies) happy with the state of health care? Muldavin noted that we spend $3 trillion on health care every year in this country, and our outcomes rank 50 out of 55 developed countries surveyed. “We’re not getting a lot done,” Muldavin said, “and real estate has a key role in turning this around.”

That includes both increased health care infrastructure — urgent care centers, ambulatory care centers, clinics and other health care-related locales are popping up to help alleviate the burden from hospitals — and buildings themselves can help enhance and promote our health.

There are programs that can control carbon dioxide and lighting levels, for example, to promote alertness and align with circadian rhythms for better sleep.

9. Immigration

“The problem with immigration and the polarization is we don’t have a comprehensive strategy,” said Muldavin.

There are, of course, implications of toughening the borders against immigration:

  • It blocks access to skilled workers.
  • It impacts innovation.
  • It hampers multifamily development, rents and home sales.
  • It impacts home and rental unit size, as immigrant families are often larger.
  • There will be fewer new household formations, fewer renters and fewer buyers.

10. Climate change

Muldavin explained that whether or not you believe in rising sea levels and climate change, it’s going to affect real estate — because new scientific algorithms might convince other people that your property will soon be (literally) underwater.

“It doesn’t even have to be true for it to affect real estate,” he said.

Muldavin lives in the San Francisco Bay Area by the water, and he explained that his big concern is less about his property and more about how he gets there (and leaves).

“If the access road floods now, I can’t get to my house today,” he said. If it gets worse….

“Even if it’s wrong, the perceptions can affect values a lot,” he said “and particularly for baby boomers when your home is such a huge part of your equity and investment, are you going to take a huge risk and not sell or move?”

By AMBER TAUFEN Staff Writer, Inman News


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What’s Up With Housing This Week?

 

Millennials May End Up Competing with Baby Boomers in Housing Market.
These two groups make up different segments of the home buyer market but they are searching for similar things.
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Kitchen Remodeling TrendsThinking About Remodeling Your Kitchen?
Homeowners generally wanted new flooring, countertops, cabinets, sinks, and faucets when they had their kitchens remodeled, says a new report.

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Flood InsuranceShould Congress raise the cost of flood insurance? How much?
The National Flood Insurance Program expires Sept. 30 and is $25 billion in debt. NAR has made flood insurance renewal a top priority, and lawmakers are now considering some dramatic program changes to keep it solvent and operational.

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Low Mortgage Rates30-year mortgage rate falls below 4%.
Long-term U.S. mortgage rates fell this week to their lowest levels of the year: 3.95%.
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Housing’s Clean Bill of Health…
All things considered, the state of the housing industry right now is pretty good.

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http://www.TitleSecurityFL.com

 


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What’s Up With Housing This Week?

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34th Street CorridorDevelopers Say St Pete’s 34th Street Corridor is Brimming with Economic Potential.
In the past, this thoroughfare has long been known as a busy yet unappealing stretch of commercial roadway.

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Rising Home Prices2 Out of 3 Buyers Believe Home Prices Will Rise
A Gallup poll finds that 61% of U.S. adults expect home prices to continue rising over the next six months – a new high for the annual survey.
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Housing Bubble? No!3 Reasons the Housing Market is NOT in a Bubble…
Mortgage lending standards are appropriate, new construction is below what is necessary and home prices haven’t even recovered. It appears fears of a housing bubble are over-exaggerated.
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Tesla's Solar Roof TilesTesla’s Solar Roof Tile Systems Hit the Market
The company is taking $1,000 deposits on the virtually “invisible” systems, which it will begin installing next month.The company offers an “infinity” warranty on its tiles that integrate solar power into roof coverings. Tesla has published a web tool that can estimate costs and savings.

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First-Time HomebuyersTampa Bay is Nation’s Second Best Metro for First-Time Homebuyers.
For first- time homebuyers, you can’t beat the Orlando and Tampa Bay areas. Despite steadily rising prices, both are relatively affordable compared to the West Coast and Northeast at a time when nearly half of all buyers are first-timers.
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What’s Up With Housing This Week?

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How to Read and Understand a Title Commitment.
Please join Title Security at 9:30am, April 25, 2017 at our Coffee Corner… Discover how the title commitment relates to the closing and the contract. You’ll walk away understanding how to read all components of a commitment, as well as how to deal with title defects and other requirements that need to be cleared before closing.

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Millennial HomebuyersWhy Rising Interest Rates Won’t Slow Housing Demand.
Title agents answering First American’s real estate sentiment index survey say an increasing desire for homeownership by Millennials and continued affordability will sustain demand.
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Commercial ConstructionFlorida commercial real estate development is booming.
Florida is among the top states in the nation for commercial real estate industry spending impact and the number of jobs the industry sustains.
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Tampa Bay home values rise at second-highest rate among country’s top 35 metro areas.
Bay area home values jumped 11.4 percent from March last year to $183,300.

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PRO LogoMarch 2017 Pinellas County Real Estate Stats Report
Stand Out Stat: Median Sale Price for Single Family was up year-over-year… $230,000 in March 2017 vs. $200,000 in March 2016.

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http://www.TitleSecurityFL.com

 


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What’s Up With Housing This Week?

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1st Time HomebuyersA Few Tips for First Time Buyers This Spring Selling Season.
What first-time millennial buyers need to know about the spring housing market.

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Florida Association of RealtorsClosing costs? What are they really?
Here’s one common pitfall on the road to a smooth closing: During the course of a transaction, it’s fairly common for a seller to offer money toward the buyer’s closing costs — and many Realtors feel that adding a quick line about this change in the contract’s additional terms section is sufficient.
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Millennial HomebuyersSeems Millennials Are Unaware that They Can Enter the Housing Market.
Knowledge is essential in order to attract this generation.
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Are We Headed for Another Bursting Housing Bubble in 2017?
“There are three basic worry indicators and all three were very scary in 2005 and all three today suggest, if anything, that the housing market is still in the process of recovery instead of being near a new bubble.”

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What’s Behind the Housing Drought
The supply of homes for sale is now at the lowest level since the National Association of Realtors began tracking inventory 18 years ago.
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http://www.TitleSecurityFL.com


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What’s Up With Housing This Week?

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Mortgage RejectionWhen it comes to mortgage rejections, Florida is No. 1
Almost 1 in 5 mortgage applications (17.1%) gets turned down in Fla., according a NerdWallet’s “Homebuyer Reality Report” that studied buyer experiences.

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Florida LegislatureFlorida Legislature 2017: Where do Realtors’ priorities stand?
The annual legislative race began this week, and Realtors will be impacted by a range of bills that will be discussed, debated and voted on over the next 60 days.

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Healthy BuildingsAn Interesting Look at the Future of Healthy Buildings.
The WELL Building Standard is the first building standard that focuses exclusively on the health and well-being of the people inside buildings, impacting the way occupants sleep, eat, and feel.

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Interior Design TrendsWhat Homeowners Want…
From statement kitchens to bold finishing touches, here are 8 trends today’s homeowners are looking for.
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Short SalesThousands of Tampa Bay residents gain equity in homes.
Will this prompt more people to put their properties up for sale, relieving the tight inventory that has been driving up bay area prices?

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http://www.TitleSecurityFL.com